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Flowery Landscapes

Marc adamus

Contrasted landscapes


Marc Adamus , a photographer specialising in landscapes, travels the world all year long in order to immortalise the changing moods of nature. He continues to surprise us thanks to his photos each more grandiose than the last. His travels inspire him and us in turn. Nature reveals itself to him as if it was preordained. From waterfall to dense forest , sunset in Chili or verdant nature stretching to the horizon, the natural world has no secrets from him.

" The world is an enormous place. There are always new adventures, new challenges. To feel like it has ‘all been done’ is silly and just shows a lack of imagination and desire."

Peter Madsen

Blurry Aesthetics

Born in 1966 in continental Denmark, Peter Madsen became interested in visual art at a very young age. When it was time for him to make a decision about his studies, there was no doubt or hesitation: the answer was photography. In 1989 with the ink barely dry on his diploma, he began specialising in publicity photographs and portraits before setting out on his own in 2003. In his professional life, his camera was a tool for satisfying clients but beyond that, it became his partner in indulging his passion: art photography . Year after year, his personal artistic projects took up more and more space in his life to the point that in 2013 he decided to consecrate most of his energy to those projects. As fascinating as it is exciting, this new artistic path allows him to lose control and let his artistic instinct take the lead to create aesthetic and spontaneous works.

The works of Peter Madsen express themselves through verdant landscapes and endless rolling fields. The lively colours of this greenery grab us. The blurry landscapes make the photographs even more interesting and create an effect of movement in the middle of a certain calm where no life seems to stir.

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BERNHARD HARTMANN

Lost paradise

In this series, Bernhard Hartmann concentrates on forgotten gardens and moves away from the sumptuous spectator-less interiors by revealing a world open to the sky. The melancholy images of Bernhard Hartmann come as a result of his frenetic, nearly obsessional, yet poetic research as he immortalises abandoned sites found during his travels . Here, nature retakes its hold little by little, invading the spaces which seem to have been forgotten by civilization. These spaces defy time, welcoming the silence that comes only after humanity has disappeared.
" I love what is beautiful. The serenity of a beautiful garden and the grave of an architectural monument must provoke the same emotion for the viewer. They must be enchanted through their emotions."