Georges Pierre

In Pierrot Le Fou, filmed in 1965, the colours are enchanting. Godard goes as far as to use colour filters for certain key scenes. The use of monochrome blue, red and yellow filters supports a connection or, on the contrary, highlights the incoherence, the dreamlike character. The film is dazzling and the blue and red colours are frequently associated. Red is Marianne?s colour and therefore symbolises violence and passion. Blue is associated with Ferdinand known as Pierrot. It is the bright blue of the sky and the sea but also the blue of absolute despair. In the final scene, the hero paints his face blue and commits suicide using primary coloured sticks of dynamite.

Details
1. Choose format
Our formats

Classic

36x24cm

Icon

19.5x13cm

Colorful

48x32cm

Large

90x60cm

Giant

120x100cm

Collection

180x120cm

Exception

225x150cm

Icon

19.5x13cm

Classic

36x24cm

Colorful

48x32cm

Large

90x60cm

Giant

120x100cm

Collection

180x120cm

Exception

225x150cm

product.actions.title
Add to cart options
Please choose the dimensions
Total
N/A
  • Fast delivery available
  • FREE returns for 15 days
  • More Info
Delivery
Delivery in Galleries
Free
Home delivery
Article Standard delivery
Classic, Sélection, Large 10€
Giant, Collector, Exeption 79€
Return
You have two weeks (from receipt of your order) to notify us about your return request.To do so, please contact our customer services who will outline the procedure.
The artist
Georges Pierre

Georges Pierre’s aim with set photography is not to turn the moving image into a fixed image, but to recreate the spirit of the film, which requires commitment and personal interpretation from the photographer. With an average of three films per year, he has photographed more than a hundred films spanning a thirty year career which began in1960.

The YellowKorner Quality
High quality prints crafted by experts
More info
Previously viewed